What are Examples of Grand Theft Under California Law? PC 487(a)

January 21, 2023

Grand theft is a serious crime in California that is defined under Penal Code 487(a). It occurs when someone takes property that belongs to another person, with the intent to permanently deprive them of it. The value of the stolen property must exceed $950 for the crime to be considered grand theft. If convicted, a person can face significant fines and prison time.

It’s also worth noting that grand theft can have serious consequences, even beyond the criminal penalties. A person convicted of grand theft may also face civil lawsuits, loss of employment or professional license, and damage to personal and professional relationships.

There are many different examples of grand theft that can occur in various settings, and each case is unique. However, some common examples of grand theft under PC 487(a) include:

Shoplifting

This occurs when someone takes items from a store without paying for them and the items exceed $950 in value. This can include taking items off the shelves, switching price tags, or using a false return.

Embezzlement

This occurs when someone takes property that has been entrusted to them, such as company funds or assets. This can include taking money from a cash register, stealing a company credit card, or diverting funds intended for a specific purpose.

Car Theft

This occurs when someone takes a vehicle that belongs to another person, with the intent to permanently deprive them of it. This can include stealing a car from a parking lot or taking a car for a joyride and never returning it.

Burglary

This occurs when someone enters a building or residence with the intent to steal property valued over $950. This can include breaking into a house or apartment or entering a building after hours.

Identity Theft

This occurs when someone takes personal information belonging to another person valued at $950 or more, with the intent to use it for financial gain. This can include stealing credit card information, using someone else’s social security number, or creating fake identification.

Fraud

This occurs when someone takes property by deceiving or defrauding another person and the value exceeds $950. This can include taking money from a bank account, using a fake check, or taking advantage of an elderly person’s trust.

Contact Us for Help in Southern California


Grand theft can be a technical crime with multiple elements, and the legal defenses available will depend on the specific circumstances of the case. You must work with an experienced criminal defense attorney who can review the evidence against you, evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your case, and advise you on the best defense strategy.

If you’re being accused of grand theft under PC 487(a), then call the Law Offices of John D. Rogers today. Contact us to schedule a free confidential consultation to discuss your options. Attorney John D. Rogers is a board-certified criminal law specialist by the State Bar of California. He routinely represents clients charged with theft crimes in both state and federal court.

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